The birth of minority legislation in the newly independent Finland and Estonia (1918–1920): a comparative analysis

This article analyzes how ethnic minorities were taken into account in the Finnish and Estonian constitutions, and why account was taken precisely in a certain way. At the same time, it approaches what kinds of views were presented by different political parties and interest groups, what kind of debate was being held in Parliament and how the matter was dealt with in the leading media. The outcome of the process in both countries was that exceptionally broad linguistic and cultural rights were given to minorities if the situation was compared with the rest of Europe.
There were several factors behind the process. One factor was the relationship between ethnic groups in Finland and Estonia in the historical perspective. Another factor was each country’s internal debate on what kind of social order in general was to be built. The third factor was how the politics in Finland and Estonia was influenced by international trends and theories about how ethnic minorities should have been treated.

Kari Alenius
University of Oulu, E-mail: kari.alenius@oulu.fi
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0339-2922

DOI number: 

https://doi.org/10.53604/rjbns.v13i2_4

Kari Alenius (2021), The birth of minority legislation in the newly independent Finland and Estonia (1918–1920): a comparative analysis. RJBNS 13(2), 61-84. DOI: 10.53604/rjbns.v13i2_4. 

Full text:

https://balticnordic.hypotheses.org/files/2022/01/06.Alenius.pdf


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search